search
Include:
The following results are related to Rural Digital Europe. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
22 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • Rural Digital Europe
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • Conference object
  • Organic Eprints
  • Rural Digital Europe

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2000
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    J. Bachinger; K. Stein-Bachinger;
    Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht

    Nearly 3 % of the total arable land of the five new States of Germany have been converted to organic farming according to the AGÖL standards. The average farm size reaches about 200 ha, while the average size of organic farms in West Germany amounts to 30 ha. The structure of the large farms in East Germany contrasts with the organic farms in West Germany and are mainly characterised by a higher complexity of organisation, involving mainly blue collar workers and low livestock units. Under the site and structural conditions of large organic farms in North-East Germany, for economic and environmental reasons, it is especially important to develop and apply special nutrient management strategies concerning the prediction and optimisation of nitrogen inputs so as to prevent deficits and losses. As long-term management strategies the calculation of humus and nitrogen balances are suitable for an overview of the nutrient fluxes of the total farm. To optimise the nitrogen uptake and to minimise nitrate leaching, the effects of specific cultivation methods, selected fields and crops, and short-term management strategies are developed for site- and situation-adapted decision making. Positive abiotic and biotic environmental effects of organic farming systems, similar to those known from small family farms, can be described or predicted for large farms in North-East Germany. These effects include significant reduction of nitrate losses through leaching and nitrate contents in the soil water; prevention of pesticide leaching; conservation and increase of the humus content; reduction of CO2-emission caused by intensive agriculture; conservation and increase of biodiversity of flora and fauna. To achieve an expansion of organic agriculture, particularly in CEE countries, the development of specific markets with higher prices (especially for milk products) and/or specific economic rewards of the positive environmental effects are necessary.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gudbrand Lien; J. Brian Hardaker; Ola Flaten;

    In economic terms, resilience in farming has to do with the capacity of a farm business to survive various risks and other shocks. Despite its importance, resilience has seldom been directly considered in evaluations of economic sustainability. A whole-farm stochastic simulation model over a 6-year planning horizon was used to analyse organic and conventional cropping systems using a model of a representative farm in Eastern Norway. The relative economic sustainability of alternative systems under changing assumptions about future technology and price regimes was examined in terms of financial survival to the end of the planning period. The same alternatives were also compared in terms of stochastic efficiency. To model the risk of business failure adequately there is a need to deal with the risk of bankruptcy, and a modification of traditional analysis was used for that purpose. The organic farming system was found to be somewhat less economically sustainable than the conventional system, especially if the organic price premiums and the organic area payments were to be phased out. The results illustrate possible conflicts between pursuit of risk efficiency and economic sustainability. The model developed could be used to support farmers’ choices between farming systems as well as to help policy makers develop more sharply targeted policies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reimund P. Rötter; Helena Kahiluoto; Heikki Lehtonen; Jyrki Aakkula; Timothy R. Carter;
    Publisher: University of Copenhagen

    To enable ex ante assessment of alternative adaptation strategies for Finnish agriculture at multiple scales, MTT Agrifood Research Finland and partner institutes recently launched a project Integrated Modeling of Agrifood Systems (IMAGES).The project aims at developing and evaluating different component (economic and biophysical) models and link them in an integrated modeling framework.

  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maurizio Canavari; Rino Ghelfi; Kent D. Olson; Sergio Rivaroli;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Italy

    Recent discussion surrounding organic agriculture (also referred to as organic farming) has turned from just whether it represents a viable alternative to conventional agriculture to whether it would be adopted by a significant percentage of farmers. After a beginning phase in which the adoption was mainly due to an ethically based choice of the farmer, the success in the market and the increasing demand for organic products are increasing the number of farmers converting their farming system. Despite a still high relevance of non-economic factors and the uncertainty given by short-term and mid-term fluctuations of prices, a decisive point is whether the conversion to organic farming may be worthwhile from an economic perspective. The question remains as to how many farmers would convert to organic farming systems. The aim of the paper is to compare the actual and potential profitability of farms using organic production methods to those farms using conventional production methods. The analysis will be based on several datasets, provided on the Italian side by Emilia-Romagna Region, Italian National Institute of Agricultural Economics (INEA), Italian National Institute of Statistics (Istat), and on the US side by the Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Locmele, I.; Legzdina, L.; Gaile, Z.; Kronberga, A.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    Šajā pētījumā iegūtie ražas stabilitātes rezultāti vasaras miežu genotipu maisījumiem un kombinēto krustojumu populācijām liecina, ka ģenētiskā daudzveidība šķirnē var nodrošināt ražas stabilitāti pa gadiem un audzēšanas vidēm. Vienkāršo un salikto populāciju ražas rezultāti skaidrojami ar mazāku vecākaugu skaitu un to ražas potenciālu, jo atbilstošu vecākaugu izvēle ir viens no būtiskākajiem kritērijiem šķirņu veidošanā.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cammarano, D.; Martre, P.; Drexler, D.; Draye, X.; Sessitsch, A.; Pecchioni, N.; Cooper, J.; Willer, H.; VOICU, A.; Hinsinger, P.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SolACE (727247)

    Due to the overlap of many disciplines and the availability of novel technologies, modern agriculture has become a wide, interdisciplinary endeavor, especially in Precision Agriculture. The adoption of a standard format for reporting field experiments can help researchers to focus on the data rather than on re-formatting and understanding the structure of the data. This paper describes how a European consortium plans to: i) create a “handbook” of protocols for reporting definitions, methodologies and Parameters measured/calculated; and ii) how a data-template for field data was created and will be linked to the “handbook”. The overall goal of the EU-funded project Solutions for Solutions for improving Agroecosystem and Crop Efficiency for water and nutrient use (SolACE) is to help European agriculture face major challenges, such as increased rainfall variability and reduced use of N and P fertilizers in order to satisfy both economic and ecological goals. The “Handbook of Protocols” and the “Data Template” have been created to achieve a flexible, standard, and clear documentation linked with the data itself to facilitate interchange of data among project’s partners and any statistical analysis and modelling of different datasets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evelyne Stoll; Christian Schader; Torsten Bohn; Rachel Reckinger; Laura Leimbrock; Gilles Altmann; Stéphanie Zimmer;

    <p>In Luxembourg, the agricultural sector was responsible for 711.7 Gg CO<sub>2</sub>-equivalents in 2016, which corresponds to 6.95 % of the total country greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Over 50 % of the farms are specialist grazing livestock farms. The beef and cattle milk production account globally together for over 60 % of the sector’s global emissions. Thus, the climate impact of the whole agricultural sector in Luxembourg can be significantly lowered by reducing the GHG emissions of the specialist grazing livestock sector. However, beyond farm type, the GHG emissions of a farm are also influenced by other factors, such as management systems and farming practices. To enable a transition towards a more climate-positive agriculture, insights into the sustainability performance in terms of climate change are needed.</p><p>The aim of this study is to determine the current sustainability performance of the Luxembourgish specialist grazing livestock sector in terms of climate change. The climate impact of the different specialist grazing livestock farm types (OTE (orientation technico-économique) 45 - Specialist dairying; OTE 46 - Specialist cattle - rearing and fattening and OTE 47 - Cattle - dairying, rearing and fattening combined) and of different management systems (conventional or organic) was assessed at farm-level. Furthermore, the relationship between the sustainability performance in terms of climate change and other areas of sustainability is being studied. Farming practices of 60 farms typical for Luxembourg in regard to their share of arable land and permanent grassland (OTE 45: 3 farms; OTE 46: 15; OTE 45: 11; Conventional: 44; Organic: 16) and their respective sustainability implications were assessed in 2019 according to the FAO SAFA Guidelines (Guidelines for the Sustainability Assessment of Food and Agriculture Systems, 2014) using the Sustainability Monitoring and Assessment RouTine (SMART)-Farm Tool (v5.0). Organic farms were highly overrepresented, with 26.7 % in the sample compared to 5 % of all Luxembourgish farms. The data was collected during a farm visit and a 3 h interview with the farm manager. The impact of management system and farm type on the SAFA-goal achievement for the sub-theme Greenhouse Gases (GHG) were studied.</p><p>The results show that the sustainability performances of the participating farms were moderate to good. Goal achievement for the sub-theme GHG was moderate and did not differ significantly between the three farm types (OTE 45: 53.3 % ±3.9 SD goal achievement; OTE 46: 55.6 % ±7.3 SD; OTE 47: 54.6 % ±6.9 SD). Organic farms showed a significantly higher mean goal achievement for GHG than conventional farms (p-value < 0.001) (organic: 58.3 % ±6.0 SD; conventional: 52.6 % ±4.4 SD). For indicators positively impacting GHG, the organic and the OTE 46 farms had generally higher ratings. Correlations between GHG and the other sub-themes were mainly in the Environmental Integrity dimension, showing that implementing climate-positive farming practices can also improve other ecological aspects. The indicator analysis identified the following linchpins: increase in protein autarky, closing of farming cycles and holistic approach with strategic decision making leading to harmonized actions towards a sustainable and climate positive farming system.</p>

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Indra Ločmele; Linda Legzdina; Dace Piliksere; Zinta Gaile; Arta Kronberga;
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    The necessity to increase genetic diversity in agriculture has been widely discussed during the last decades. Heterogeneous populations is one of the ways to increase genetic diversity in varieties of self-pollinating cereals. The aim of this research was to compare grain yield, its stability, foliar diseases severity and competitiveness against the weeds of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) populations and homogenous varieties. Field trials consisting of three types of populations (simple, complex and composite cross populations – CCP) containing different levels of diversity and three check varieties were carried out during 2015-2018 under organic and conventional farming systems. No one of the populations had a significantly higher average yield than any of the check varieties. CCP1 showed a tendency to be more productive under organic growing conditions and can be characterized as widely adaptable to various growing conditions with a significantly higher yield as the average overall environments. One of the complex populations showed adaptability to favorable growing conditions and yield insignificantly higher than overall average. Other studied populations can be characterized with wide adaptability and various yield levels. For most of the populations under organic and conventional conditions, a significantly lower net blotch (caused by Pyrenophora teres) severity was observed in comparison with the most susceptible variety; infection with powdery mildew (caused by Blumeria graminis) lower than for check varieties was observed under organic growing conditions, whereas such trend was not observed under conventional conditions. All populations had a significantly lower crop ground cover and slightly lower competiveness against weeds than the variety with the best competitiveness.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    V.I.O. Olowe; Olabisi T. Somefun;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    There is a dearth of information on synthesis of research studies in different areas of organic agriculture in the world. This could partly be attributed to limited funding of basic and applied organic agriculture research projects. Consequently, the development of innovations that can properly tackle multifarious challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector is being hindered. Research findings are usually disseminated to the end users such as other researchers, stakeholders, policy makers, and politicians among others through different outlets including conference proceedings. Therefore, a synthesis of 1118 scientific papers presented at the last four editions (2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th) of ISOFAR Scientific Conferences held in 2008, 2011, 2014, and 2017, respectively, was carried out in 2019 to establish the distribution of research efforts across research areas and identify areas not receiving adequate attention. The results revealed that 45.8–66.6% of papers presented were on agronomy (crop and soil) followed by socio-economics (9.8–20.3%) and livestock (3.9–14.7%). Very few scientific papers (0.0–4.0%) were based on organic aquaculture, policy issues, health and safety of organic products, and standards and certification. The papers were more skewed towards the production phase of the value chains on most commodities than the phase involving processing, distribution, and consumption. It is recommended that in the nearest future, inter- and transdisciplinary research projects be commissioned to explore the potential of these identified and largely overlooked research areas in solving global challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Phillipa Nicholas; Serena Mandolesi; Simona Naspetti; Raffaele Zanoli;
    Project: EC | SOLID (266367)

    The growth in organic and low-input farming practices is driven by both market demand for high quality, safe food, and European Union policy support, and these types of farming practices are considered in European Union policies for sustainable production, food quality, healthy life, and rural development. However, many constraints to the development of low-input and organic dairy farming supply chains have been identified, including economic, political, and technical constraints. In order for these types of supply chains to develop and provide further benefits to society, innovations are required to improve their sustainability. However, an innovation will only be taken up and result in desirable change if the whole supply chain accepts the innovation. In this paper, Q methodology is used to identify the acceptability of dairy supply chain innovations to low-input and organic supply chain members and consumers in Belgium, Finland, Italy, and the United Kingdom. A strong consensus existed across all respondents on innovations that were deemed as unacceptable. The use of genetically modified and transgenic organisms in the farming system and innovations perceived as conflicting with the naturalness of the production system and products were strongly rejected. Innovations that were strongly liked across all participants in the study were those related to improving animal welfare and improving forage quality to be able to reduce the need for purchased concentrate feeds. Only minor differences existed between countries as to where the priorities lay in terms of innovation acceptability.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Rural Digital Europe. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
22 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2000
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    J. Bachinger; K. Stein-Bachinger;
    Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht

    Nearly 3 % of the total arable land of the five new States of Germany have been converted to organic farming according to the AGÖL standards. The average farm size reaches about 200 ha, while the average size of organic farms in West Germany amounts to 30 ha. The structure of the large farms in East Germany contrasts with the organic farms in West Germany and are mainly characterised by a higher complexity of organisation, involving mainly blue collar workers and low livestock units. Under the site and structural conditions of large organic farms in North-East Germany, for economic and environmental reasons, it is especially important to develop and apply special nutrient management strategies concerning the prediction and optimisation of nitrogen inputs so as to prevent deficits and losses. As long-term management strategies the calculation of humus and nitrogen balances are suitable for an overview of the nutrient fluxes of the total farm. To optimise the nitrogen uptake and to minimise nitrate leaching, the effects of specific cultivation methods, selected fields and crops, and short-term management strategies are developed for site- and situation-adapted decision making. Positive abiotic and biotic environmental effects of organic farming systems, similar to those known from small family farms, can be described or predicted for large farms in North-East Germany. These effects include significant reduction of nitrate losses through leaching and nitrate contents in the soil water; prevention of pesticide leaching; conservation and increase of the humus content; reduction of CO2-emission caused by intensive agriculture; conservation and increase of biodiversity of flora and fauna. To achieve an expansion of organic agriculture, particularly in CEE countries, the development of specific markets with higher prices (especially for milk products) and/or specific economic rewards of the positive environmental effects are necessary.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gudbrand Lien; J. Brian Hardaker; Ola Flaten;

    In economic terms, resilience in farming has to do with the capacity of a farm business to survive various risks and other shocks. Despite its importance, resilience has seldom been directly considered in evaluations of economic sustainability. A whole-farm stochastic simulation model over a 6-year planning horizon was used to analyse organic and conventional cropping systems using a model of a representative farm in Eastern Norway. The relative economic sustainability of alternative systems under changing assumptions about future technology and price regimes was examined in terms of financial survival to the end of the planning period. The same alternatives were also compared in terms of stochastic efficiency. To model the risk of business failure adequately there is a need to deal with the risk of bankruptcy, and a modification of traditional analysis was used for that purpose. The organic farming system was found to be somewhat less economically sustainable than the conventional system, especially if the organic price premiums and the organic area payments were to be phased out. The results illustrate possible conflicts between pursuit of risk efficiency and economic sustainability. The model developed could be used to support farmers’ choices between farming systems as well as to help policy makers develop more sharply targeted policies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reimund P. Rötter; Helena Kahiluoto; Heikki Lehtonen; Jyrki Aakkula; Timothy R. Carter;
    Publisher: University of Copenhagen

    To enable ex ante assessment of alternative adaptation strategies for Finnish agriculture at multiple scales, MTT Agrifood Research Finland and partner institutes recently launched a project Integrated Modeling of Agrifood Systems (IMAGES).The project aims at developing and evaluating different component (economic and biophysical) models and link them in an integrated modeling framework.

  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maurizio Canavari; Rino Ghelfi; Kent D. Olson; Sergio Rivaroli;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Italy

    Recent discussion surrounding organic agriculture (also referred to as organic farming) has turned from just whether it represents a viable alternative to conventional agriculture to whether it would be adopted by a significant percentage of farmers. After a beginning phase in which the adoption was mainly due to an ethically based choice of the farmer, the success in the market and the increasing demand for organic products are increasing the number of farmers converting their farming system. Despite a still high relevance of non-economic factors and the uncertainty given by short-term and mid-term fluctuations of prices, a decisive point is whether the conversion to organic farming may be worthwhile from an economic perspective. The question remains as to how many farmers would convert to organic farming systems. The aim of the paper is to compare the actual and potential profitability of farms using organic production methods to those farms using conventional production methods. The analysis will be based on several datasets, provided on the Italian side by Emilia-Romagna Region, Italian National Institute of Agricultural Economics (INEA), Italian National Institute of Statistics (Istat), and on the US side by the Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Locmele, I.; Legzdina, L.; Gaile, Z.; Kronberga, A.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    Šajā pētījumā iegūtie ražas stabilitātes rezultāti vasaras miežu genotipu maisījumiem un kombinēto krustojumu populācijām liecina, ka ģenētiskā daudzveidība šķirnē var nodrošināt ražas stabilitāti pa gadiem un audzēšanas vidēm. Vienkāršo un salikto populāciju ražas rezultāti skaidrojami ar mazāku vecākaugu skaitu un to ražas potenciālu, jo atbilstošu vecākaugu izvēle ir viens no būtiskākajiem kritērijiem šķirņu veidošanā.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cammarano, D.; Martre, P.; Drexler, D.; Draye, X.; Sessitsch, A.; Pecchioni, N.; Cooper, J.; Willer, H.; VOICU, A.; Hinsinger, P.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SolACE (727247)

    Due to the overlap of many disciplines and the availability of novel technologies, modern agriculture has become a wide, interdisciplinary endeavor, especially in Precision Agriculture. The adoption of a standard format for reporting field experiments can help researchers to focus on the data rather than on re-formatting and understanding the structure of the data. This paper describes how a European consortium plans to: i) create a “handbook” of protocols for reporting definitions, methodologies and Parameters measured/calculated; and ii) how a data-template for field data was created and will be linked to the “handbook”. The overall goal of the EU-funded project Solutions for Solutions for improving Agroecosystem and Crop Efficiency for water and nutrient use (SolACE) is to help European agriculture face major challenges, such as increased rainfall variability and reduced use of N and P fertilizers in order to satisfy both economic and ecological goals. The “Handbook of Protocols” and the “Data Template” have been created to achieve a flexible, standard, and clear documentation linked with the data itself to facilitate interchange of data among project’s partners and any statistical analysis and modelling of different datasets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evelyne Stoll; Christian Schader; Torsten Bohn; Rachel Reckinger; Laura Leimbrock; Gilles Altmann; Stéphanie Zimmer;

    <p>In Luxembourg, the agricultural sector was responsible for 711.7 Gg CO<sub>2</sub>-equivalents in 2016, which corresponds to 6.95 % of the total country greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Over 50 % of the farms are specialist grazing livestock farms. The beef and cattle milk production account globally together for over 60 % of the sector’s global emissions. Thus, the climate impact of the whole agricultural sector in Luxembourg can be significantly lowered by reducing the GHG emissions of the specialist grazing livestock sector. However, beyond farm type, the GHG emissions of a farm are also influenced by other factors, such as management systems and farming practices. To enable a transition towards a more climate-positive agriculture, insights into the sustainability performance in terms of climate change are needed.</p><p>The aim of this study is to determine the current sustainability performance of the Luxembourgish specialist grazing livestock sector in terms of climate change. The climate impact of the different specialist grazing livestock farm types (OTE (orientation technico-économique) 45 - Specialist dairying; OTE 46 - Specialist cattle - rearing and fattening and OTE 47 - Cattle - dairying, rearing and fattening combined) and of different management systems (conventional or organic) was assessed at farm-level. Furthermore, the relationship between the sustainability performance in terms of climate change and other areas of sustainability is being studied. Farming practices of 60 farms typical for Luxembourg in regard to their share of arable land and permanent grassland (OTE 45: 3 farms; OTE 46: 15; OTE 45: 11; Conventional: 44; Organic: 16) and their respective sustainability implications were assessed in 2019 according to the FAO SAFA Guidelines (Guidelines for the Sustainability Assessment of Food and Agriculture Systems, 2014) using the Sustainability Monitoring and Assessment RouTine (SMART)-Farm Tool (v5.0). Organic farms were highly overrepresented, with 26.7 % in the sample compared to 5 % of all Luxembourgish farms. The data was collected during a farm visit and a 3 h interview with the farm manager. The impact of management system and farm type on the SAFA-goal achievement for the sub-theme Greenhouse Gases (GHG) were studied.</p><p>The results show that the sustainability performances of the participating farms were moderate to good. Goal achievement for the sub-theme GHG was moderate and did not differ significantly between the three farm types (OTE 45: 53.3 % ±3.9 SD goal achievement; OTE 46: 55.6 % ±7.3 SD; OTE 47: 54.6 % ±6.9 SD). Organic farms showed a significantly higher mean goal achievement for GHG than conventional farms (p-value < 0.001) (organic: 58.3 % ±6.0 SD; conventional: 52.6 % ±4.4 SD). For indicators positively impacting GHG, the organic and the OTE 46 farms had generally higher ratings. Correlations between GHG and the other sub-themes were mainly in the Environmental Integrity dimension, showing that implementing climate-positive farming practices can also improve other ecological aspects. The indicator analysis identified the following linchpins: increase in protein autarky, closing of farming cycles and holistic approach with strategic decision making leading to harmonized actions towards a sustainable and climate positive farming system.</p>

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Indra Ločmele; Linda Legzdina; Dace Piliksere; Zinta Gaile; Arta Kronberga;
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    The necessity to increase genetic diversity in agriculture has been widely discussed during the last decades. Heterogeneous populations is one of the ways to increase genetic diversity in varieties of self-pollinating cereals. The aim of this research was to compare grain yield, its stability, foliar diseases severity and competitiveness against the weeds of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) populations and homogenous varieties. Field trials consisting of three types of populations (simple, complex and composite cross populations – CCP) containing different levels of diversity and three check varieties were carried out during 2015-2018 under organic and conventional farming systems. No one of the populations had a significantly higher average yield than any of the check varieties. CCP1 showed a tendency to be more productive under organic growing conditions and can be characterized as widely adaptable to various growing conditions with a significantly higher yield as the average overall environments. One of the complex populations showed adaptability to favorable growing conditions and yield insignificantly higher than overall average. Other studied populations can be characterized with wide adaptability and various yield levels. For most of the populations under organic and conventional conditions, a significantly lower net blotch (caused by Pyrenophora teres) severity was observed in comparison with the most susceptible variety; infection with powdery mildew (caused by Blumeria graminis) lower than for check varieties was observed under organic growing conditions, whereas such trend was not observed under conventional conditions. All populations had a significantly lower crop ground cover and slightly lower competiveness against weeds than the variety with the best competitiveness.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    V.I.O. Olowe; Olabisi T. Somefun;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    There is a dearth of information on synthesis of research studies in different areas of organic agriculture in the world. This could partly be attributed to limited funding of basic and applied organic agriculture research projects. Consequently, the development of innovations that can properly tackle multifarious challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector is being hindered. Research findings are usually disseminated to the end users such as other researchers, stakeholders, policy makers, and politicians among others through different outlets including conference proceedings. Therefore, a synthesis of 1118 scientific papers presented at the last four editions (2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th) of ISOFAR Scientific Conferences held in 2008, 2011, 2014, and 2017, respectively, was carried out in 2019 to establish the distribution of research efforts across research areas and identify areas not receiving adequate attention. The results revealed that 45.8–66.6% of papers presented were on agronomy (crop and soil) followed by socio-economics (9.8–20.3%) and livestock (3.9–14.7%). Very few scientific papers (0.0–4.0%) were based on organic aquaculture, policy issues, health and safety of organic products, and standards and certification. The papers were more skewed towards the production phase of the value chains on most commodities than the phase involving processing, distribution, and consumption. It is recommended that in the nearest future, inter- and transdisciplinary research projects be commissioned to explore the potential of these identified and largely overlooked research areas in solving global challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Phillipa Nicholas; Serena Mandolesi; Simona Naspetti; Raffaele Zanoli;
    Project: EC | SOLID (266367)

    The growth in organic and low-input farming practices is driven by both market demand for high quality, safe food, and European Union policy support, and these types of farming practices are considered in European Union policies for sustainable production, food quality, healthy life, and rural development. However, many constraints to the development of low-input and organic dairy farming supply chains have been identified, including economic, political, and technical constraints. In order for these types of supply chains to develop and provide further benefits to society, innovations are required to improve their sustainability. However, an innovation will only be taken up and result in desirable change if the whole supply chain accepts the innovation. In this paper, Q methodology is used to identify the acceptability of dairy supply chain innovations to low-input and organic supply chain members and consumers in Belgium, Finland, Italy, and the United Kingdom. A strong consensus existed across all respondents on innovations that were deemed as unacceptable. The use of genetically modified and transgenic organisms in the farming system and innovations perceived as conflicting with the naturalness of the production system and products were strongly rejected. Innovations that were strongly liked across all participants in the study were those related to improving animal welfare and improving forage quality to be able to reduce the need for purchased concentrate feeds. Only minor differences existed between countries as to where the priorities lay in terms of innovation acceptability.