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15 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Rural Digital Europe
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • 2013-2022
  • Conference object
  • Organic Eprints
  • Rural Digital Europe

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Locmele, I.; Legzdina, L.; Gaile, Z.; Kronberga, A.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    Šajā pētījumā iegūtie ražas stabilitātes rezultāti vasaras miežu genotipu maisījumiem un kombinēto krustojumu populācijām liecina, ka ģenētiskā daudzveidība šķirnē var nodrošināt ražas stabilitāti pa gadiem un audzēšanas vidēm. Vienkāršo un salikto populāciju ražas rezultāti skaidrojami ar mazāku vecākaugu skaitu un to ražas potenciālu, jo atbilstošu vecākaugu izvēle ir viens no būtiskākajiem kritērijiem šķirņu veidošanā.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cammarano, D.; Martre, P.; Drexler, D.; Draye, X.; Sessitsch, A.; Pecchioni, N.; Cooper, J.; Willer, H.; VOICU, A.; Hinsinger, P.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SolACE (727247)

    Due to the overlap of many disciplines and the availability of novel technologies, modern agriculture has become a wide, interdisciplinary endeavor, especially in Precision Agriculture. The adoption of a standard format for reporting field experiments can help researchers to focus on the data rather than on re-formatting and understanding the structure of the data. This paper describes how a European consortium plans to: i) create a “handbook” of protocols for reporting definitions, methodologies and Parameters measured/calculated; and ii) how a data-template for field data was created and will be linked to the “handbook”. The overall goal of the EU-funded project Solutions for Solutions for improving Agroecosystem and Crop Efficiency for water and nutrient use (SolACE) is to help European agriculture face major challenges, such as increased rainfall variability and reduced use of N and P fertilizers in order to satisfy both economic and ecological goals. The “Handbook of Protocols” and the “Data Template” have been created to achieve a flexible, standard, and clear documentation linked with the data itself to facilitate interchange of data among project’s partners and any statistical analysis and modelling of different datasets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evelyne Stoll; Christian Schader; Torsten Bohn; Rachel Reckinger; Laura Leimbrock; Gilles Altmann; Stéphanie Zimmer;

    <p>In Luxembourg, the agricultural sector was responsible for 711.7 Gg CO<sub>2</sub>-equivalents in 2016, which corresponds to 6.95 % of the total country greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Over 50 % of the farms are specialist grazing livestock farms. The beef and cattle milk production account globally together for over 60 % of the sector’s global emissions. Thus, the climate impact of the whole agricultural sector in Luxembourg can be significantly lowered by reducing the GHG emissions of the specialist grazing livestock sector. However, beyond farm type, the GHG emissions of a farm are also influenced by other factors, such as management systems and farming practices. To enable a transition towards a more climate-positive agriculture, insights into the sustainability performance in terms of climate change are needed.</p><p>The aim of this study is to determine the current sustainability performance of the Luxembourgish specialist grazing livestock sector in terms of climate change. The climate impact of the different specialist grazing livestock farm types (OTE (orientation technico-économique) 45 - Specialist dairying; OTE 46 - Specialist cattle - rearing and fattening and OTE 47 - Cattle - dairying, rearing and fattening combined) and of different management systems (conventional or organic) was assessed at farm-level. Furthermore, the relationship between the sustainability performance in terms of climate change and other areas of sustainability is being studied. Farming practices of 60 farms typical for Luxembourg in regard to their share of arable land and permanent grassland (OTE 45: 3 farms; OTE 46: 15; OTE 45: 11; Conventional: 44; Organic: 16) and their respective sustainability implications were assessed in 2019 according to the FAO SAFA Guidelines (Guidelines for the Sustainability Assessment of Food and Agriculture Systems, 2014) using the Sustainability Monitoring and Assessment RouTine (SMART)-Farm Tool (v5.0). Organic farms were highly overrepresented, with 26.7 % in the sample compared to 5 % of all Luxembourgish farms. The data was collected during a farm visit and a 3 h interview with the farm manager. The impact of management system and farm type on the SAFA-goal achievement for the sub-theme Greenhouse Gases (GHG) were studied.</p><p>The results show that the sustainability performances of the participating farms were moderate to good. Goal achievement for the sub-theme GHG was moderate and did not differ significantly between the three farm types (OTE 45: 53.3 % ±3.9 SD goal achievement; OTE 46: 55.6 % ±7.3 SD; OTE 47: 54.6 % ±6.9 SD). Organic farms showed a significantly higher mean goal achievement for GHG than conventional farms (p-value < 0.001) (organic: 58.3 % ±6.0 SD; conventional: 52.6 % ±4.4 SD). For indicators positively impacting GHG, the organic and the OTE 46 farms had generally higher ratings. Correlations between GHG and the other sub-themes were mainly in the Environmental Integrity dimension, showing that implementing climate-positive farming practices can also improve other ecological aspects. The indicator analysis identified the following linchpins: increase in protein autarky, closing of farming cycles and holistic approach with strategic decision making leading to harmonized actions towards a sustainable and climate positive farming system.</p>

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Indra Ločmele; Linda Legzdina; Dace Piliksere; Zinta Gaile; Arta Kronberga;
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    The necessity to increase genetic diversity in agriculture has been widely discussed during the last decades. Heterogeneous populations is one of the ways to increase genetic diversity in varieties of self-pollinating cereals. The aim of this research was to compare grain yield, its stability, foliar diseases severity and competitiveness against the weeds of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) populations and homogenous varieties. Field trials consisting of three types of populations (simple, complex and composite cross populations – CCP) containing different levels of diversity and three check varieties were carried out during 2015-2018 under organic and conventional farming systems. No one of the populations had a significantly higher average yield than any of the check varieties. CCP1 showed a tendency to be more productive under organic growing conditions and can be characterized as widely adaptable to various growing conditions with a significantly higher yield as the average overall environments. One of the complex populations showed adaptability to favorable growing conditions and yield insignificantly higher than overall average. Other studied populations can be characterized with wide adaptability and various yield levels. For most of the populations under organic and conventional conditions, a significantly lower net blotch (caused by Pyrenophora teres) severity was observed in comparison with the most susceptible variety; infection with powdery mildew (caused by Blumeria graminis) lower than for check varieties was observed under organic growing conditions, whereas such trend was not observed under conventional conditions. All populations had a significantly lower crop ground cover and slightly lower competiveness against weeds than the variety with the best competitiveness.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    V.I.O. Olowe; Olabisi T. Somefun;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    There is a dearth of information on synthesis of research studies in different areas of organic agriculture in the world. This could partly be attributed to limited funding of basic and applied organic agriculture research projects. Consequently, the development of innovations that can properly tackle multifarious challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector is being hindered. Research findings are usually disseminated to the end users such as other researchers, stakeholders, policy makers, and politicians among others through different outlets including conference proceedings. Therefore, a synthesis of 1118 scientific papers presented at the last four editions (2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th) of ISOFAR Scientific Conferences held in 2008, 2011, 2014, and 2017, respectively, was carried out in 2019 to establish the distribution of research efforts across research areas and identify areas not receiving adequate attention. The results revealed that 45.8–66.6% of papers presented were on agronomy (crop and soil) followed by socio-economics (9.8–20.3%) and livestock (3.9–14.7%). Very few scientific papers (0.0–4.0%) were based on organic aquaculture, policy issues, health and safety of organic products, and standards and certification. The papers were more skewed towards the production phase of the value chains on most commodities than the phase involving processing, distribution, and consumption. It is recommended that in the nearest future, inter- and transdisciplinary research projects be commissioned to explore the potential of these identified and largely overlooked research areas in solving global challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Phillipa Nicholas; Serena Mandolesi; Simona Naspetti; Raffaele Zanoli;
    Project: EC | SOLID (266367)

    The growth in organic and low-input farming practices is driven by both market demand for high quality, safe food, and European Union policy support, and these types of farming practices are considered in European Union policies for sustainable production, food quality, healthy life, and rural development. However, many constraints to the development of low-input and organic dairy farming supply chains have been identified, including economic, political, and technical constraints. In order for these types of supply chains to develop and provide further benefits to society, innovations are required to improve their sustainability. However, an innovation will only be taken up and result in desirable change if the whole supply chain accepts the innovation. In this paper, Q methodology is used to identify the acceptability of dairy supply chain innovations to low-input and organic supply chain members and consumers in Belgium, Finland, Italy, and the United Kingdom. A strong consensus existed across all respondents on innovations that were deemed as unacceptable. The use of genetically modified and transgenic organisms in the farming system and innovations perceived as conflicting with the naturalness of the production system and products were strongly rejected. Innovations that were strongly liked across all participants in the study were those related to improving animal welfare and improving forage quality to be able to reduce the need for purchased concentrate feeds. Only minor differences existed between countries as to where the priorities lay in terms of innovation acceptability.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anne Krus; Dirk van Apeldoorn; Constantino Valero; Juan Jose Ramirez;
    Publisher: E.T.S. de Ingeniería Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas (UPM)
    Countries: Spain, Netherlands

    The SUREVEG project focuses on improvement of biodiversity and soil fertility in organic agriculture through strip-cropping systems. To counter the additional workforce a robotic tool is proposed. Within the project, a modular proof of concept (POC) version will be produced that will combine detection technologies with actuation on a single-plant level in the form of a robotic arm. This article focuses on the detection of crop characteristics through point clouds obtained with two lidars. Segregation in soil and plants was successfully achieved without the use of additional data from other sensor types, by calculating weighted sums, resulting in a dynamically obtained threshold criterion. This method was able to extract the vegetation from the point cloud in strips with varying vegetation coverage and sizes. The resulting vegetation clouds were compared to drone imagery, to prove they perfectly matched all green areas in said image. By dividing the remaining clouds of overlapping plants by means of the nominal planting distance, the number of plants, their volumes, and thereby the expected yields per row could be determined.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Axelle Poizat; Florence Bonnet-Beaugrand; Arnaud Rault; Christine Fourichon; Nathalie Bareille;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Mastitis is a bacterial disease common in dairy farms. Although knowledge about mastitis and its optimal technical management and treatment is now available, some dairy farmers still use antibiotics in inappropriate ways. Antibiotic use by farmers can be influenced by personal restraints and motivations, but it can be assumed that external drivers are also influential. The main purpose of this article is thus to analyse the choices of antibiotic and alternative medicine use for mastitis treatment and investigate the possible influence of two unexplored external drivers in dairy farms: (i) the health advice offered to farmers by farm advisors and veterinarians, (ii) the dairy farming system, as defined by combining the market valuation chosen for the milk, the level of intensification, and the perceived pressure related to investments. Research was based on 51 individual semi-structured interviews with farmers and their corresponding veterinarians and farm advisors. Based on verbatim, the use of antibiotics and alternative medicine by farmers for mastitis treatment, the vet-farmers interactions, and the dairy farming systems are described. The advisory relationships between farmers and farm advisors and between farmers and veterinarians influenced the implementation of selective dry cow therapy, but had very little effect on the use of alternative medicines by farmers, who were more willing to experiment alternative medicines than their advisors. The dairy farming system had very little influence on antibiotic use: some misuse of antibiotics was found whatever the farming system. Systematic dry cow therapy was also a widespread habit in all dairy farming systems except organic. The use of alternative medicine was common in all farming systems.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Presentation . Conference object . Other literature type . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rasmussen, Ilse Ankjær; Jensen, Allan Leck;

    The Open Access archive Organic Eprints (www.orgprints.org) has developed since the start in 2002 so that it now includes more than 16,000 items and gets more than 240,000 visits per month. The archive is open for all to use and registered users can deposit their research publications from refereed journals as well as non-refereed sources. Organic Eprints is the largest database in the world with publications about Organic Agriculture & Food Systems research. Organic Eprints have 26 national editors checking the deposits for bibliographical correctness and subject relevance. Organic Eprints has adapted the use of keywords from an external thesaurus, AgroVoc.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tobechi Onyenali; V.I.O. Olowe; T. O. Fabunmi; A. A. Soretire;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) yield in tropical Africa remains below 1 t/ha partly because most growers rarely use beneficial organic soil amendments on degraded tropical soils. Therefore, field trials were conducted during the late cropping seasons (July–November) of 2015 and 2016 on the organic research plots of the Institute of Food Security, Environmental Resources and Agricultural Research, Nigeria (7° 13′ 51.17″ N and 7° 13′ 53.16″ N and longitudes 3° 23′ 49.12″ E and 3° 23′ 51.86″ E 131.5 m above sea level), the trials evaluated the agronomic response of five recently released soybean varieties (TGx 1448-2E, TGx 1440-1E, TGx 1740-2F, TGx 1987-62F, and TGx 1835-10E) to the application of three organic fertilizers (Aleshinloye grade B, Organo Farm, and Gateway) and a control. The trials were laid out in randomized complete block design (RCBD) in a 5 × 4 factorial arrangement and replicated three times. Data were collected on growth parameters, yield and yield attributes, and seed quality. Significant (p < 0.05, F test) varietal difference was recorded for aboveground plant weight, grain filling period, height at physiological maturity, number and weight of pods, number of branches and seed yield, and quality in both years. Application of organic fertilizers significantly (p < 0.05, F test) increased aboveground plant weight, number of branches and pods per plant, weight of seeds per plant, seed yield, and quality in both years relative to the control treatment, except oil content and seed yield in 2016. It is recommended that the three organic fertilizers can be used for soybean cultivation since soybeans grown on treated plots produced seed yield above 1/ton in both contrasting years of experimentation.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Rural Digital Europe. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
15 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Locmele, I.; Legzdina, L.; Gaile, Z.; Kronberga, A.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    Šajā pētījumā iegūtie ražas stabilitātes rezultāti vasaras miežu genotipu maisījumiem un kombinēto krustojumu populācijām liecina, ka ģenētiskā daudzveidība šķirnē var nodrošināt ražas stabilitāti pa gadiem un audzēšanas vidēm. Vienkāršo un salikto populāciju ražas rezultāti skaidrojami ar mazāku vecākaugu skaitu un to ražas potenciālu, jo atbilstošu vecākaugu izvēle ir viens no būtiskākajiem kritērijiem šķirņu veidošanā.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cammarano, D.; Martre, P.; Drexler, D.; Draye, X.; Sessitsch, A.; Pecchioni, N.; Cooper, J.; Willer, H.; VOICU, A.; Hinsinger, P.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SolACE (727247)

    Due to the overlap of many disciplines and the availability of novel technologies, modern agriculture has become a wide, interdisciplinary endeavor, especially in Precision Agriculture. The adoption of a standard format for reporting field experiments can help researchers to focus on the data rather than on re-formatting and understanding the structure of the data. This paper describes how a European consortium plans to: i) create a “handbook” of protocols for reporting definitions, methodologies and Parameters measured/calculated; and ii) how a data-template for field data was created and will be linked to the “handbook”. The overall goal of the EU-funded project Solutions for Solutions for improving Agroecosystem and Crop Efficiency for water and nutrient use (SolACE) is to help European agriculture face major challenges, such as increased rainfall variability and reduced use of N and P fertilizers in order to satisfy both economic and ecological goals. The “Handbook of Protocols” and the “Data Template” have been created to achieve a flexible, standard, and clear documentation linked with the data itself to facilitate interchange of data among project’s partners and any statistical analysis and modelling of different datasets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evelyne Stoll; Christian Schader; Torsten Bohn; Rachel Reckinger; Laura Leimbrock; Gilles Altmann; Stéphanie Zimmer;

    &lt;p&gt;In Luxembourg, the agricultural sector was responsible for 711.7 Gg CO&lt;sub&gt;2&lt;/sub&gt;-equivalents in 2016, which corresponds to 6.95 % of the total country greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Over 50 % of the farms are specialist grazing livestock farms. The beef and cattle milk production account globally together for over 60 % of the sector&amp;#8217;s global emissions. Thus, the climate impact of the whole agricultural sector in Luxembourg can be significantly lowered by reducing the GHG emissions of the specialist grazing livestock sector. However, beyond farm type, the GHG emissions of a farm are also influenced by other factors, such as management systems and farming practices. To enable a transition towards a more climate-positive agriculture, insights into the sustainability performance in terms of climate change are needed.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;The aim of this study is to determine the current sustainability performance of the Luxembourgish specialist grazing livestock sector in terms of climate change. The climate impact of the different specialist grazing livestock farm types (OTE (orientation technico-&amp;#233;conomique) 45 - Specialist dairying; OTE 46 - Specialist cattle - rearing and fattening and OTE 47 - Cattle - dairying, rearing and fattening combined) and of different management systems (conventional or organic) was assessed at farm-level. Furthermore, the relationship between the sustainability performance in terms of climate change and other areas of sustainability is being studied. Farming practices of 60 farms typical for Luxembourg in regard to their share of arable land and permanent grassland (OTE 45: 3 farms; OTE 46: 15; OTE 45: 11; Conventional: 44; Organic: 16) and their respective sustainability implications were assessed in 2019 according to the FAO SAFA Guidelines (Guidelines for the Sustainability Assessment of Food and Agriculture Systems, 2014) using the Sustainability Monitoring and Assessment RouTine (SMART)-Farm Tool (v5.0). Organic farms were highly overrepresented, with 26.7 % in the sample compared to 5 % of all Luxembourgish farms. The data was collected during a farm visit and a 3 h interview with the farm manager. The impact of management system and farm type on the SAFA-goal achievement for the sub-theme Greenhouse Gases (GHG) were studied.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;The results show that the sustainability performances of the participating farms were moderate to good. Goal achievement for the sub-theme GHG was moderate and did not differ significantly between the three farm types (OTE 45: 53.3 % &amp;#177;3.9 SD goal achievement; OTE 46: 55.6 % &amp;#177;7.3 SD; OTE 47: 54.6 % &amp;#177;6.9 SD). Organic farms showed a significantly higher mean goal achievement for GHG than conventional farms (p-value &lt; 0.001) (organic: 58.3 % &amp;#177;6.0 SD; conventional: 52.6 % &amp;#177;4.4 SD). For indicators positively impacting GHG, the organic and the OTE 46 farms had generally higher ratings. Correlations between GHG and the other sub-themes were mainly in the Environmental Integrity dimension, showing that implementing climate-positive farming practices can also improve other ecological aspects. The indicator analysis identified the following linchpins: increase in protein autarky, closing of farming cycles and holistic approach with strategic decision making leading to harmonized actions towards a sustainable and climate positive farming system.&lt;/p&gt;

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Indra Ločmele; Linda Legzdina; Dace Piliksere; Zinta Gaile; Arta Kronberga;
    Project: EC | LIVESEED (727230)

    The necessity to increase genetic diversity in agriculture has been widely discussed during the last decades. Heterogeneous populations is one of the ways to increase genetic diversity in varieties of self-pollinating cereals. The aim of this research was to compare grain yield, its stability, foliar diseases severity and competitiveness against the weeds of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) populations and homogenous varieties. Field trials consisting of three types of populations (simple, complex and composite cross populations – CCP) containing different levels of diversity and three check varieties were carried out during 2015-2018 under organic and conventional farming systems. No one of the populations had a significantly higher average yield than any of the check varieties. CCP1 showed a tendency to be more productive under organic growing conditions and can be characterized as widely adaptable to various growing conditions with a significantly higher yield as the average overall environments. One of the complex populations showed adaptability to favorable growing conditions and yield insignificantly higher than overall average. Other studied populations can be characterized with wide adaptability and various yield levels. For most of the populations under organic and conventional conditions, a significantly lower net blotch (caused by Pyrenophora teres) severity was observed in comparison with the most susceptible variety; infection with powdery mildew (caused by Blumeria graminis) lower than for check varieties was observed under organic growing conditions, whereas such trend was not observed under conventional conditions. All populations had a significantly lower crop ground cover and slightly lower competiveness against weeds than the variety with the best competitiveness.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    V.I.O. Olowe; Olabisi T. Somefun;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    There is a dearth of information on synthesis of research studies in different areas of organic agriculture in the world. This could partly be attributed to limited funding of basic and applied organic agriculture research projects. Consequently, the development of innovations that can properly tackle multifarious challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector is being hindered. Research findings are usually disseminated to the end users such as other researchers, stakeholders, policy makers, and politicians among others through different outlets including conference proceedings. Therefore, a synthesis of 1118 scientific papers presented at the last four editions (2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th) of ISOFAR Scientific Conferences held in 2008, 2011, 2014, and 2017, respectively, was carried out in 2019 to establish the distribution of research efforts across research areas and identify areas not receiving adequate attention. The results revealed that 45.8–66.6% of papers presented were on agronomy (crop and soil) followed by socio-economics (9.8–20.3%) and livestock (3.9–14.7%). Very few scientific papers (0.0–4.0%) were based on organic aquaculture, policy issues, health and safety of organic products, and standards and certification. The papers were more skewed towards the production phase of the value chains on most commodities than the phase involving processing, distribution, and consumption. It is recommended that in the nearest future, inter- and transdisciplinary research projects be commissioned to explore the potential of these identified and largely overlooked research areas in solving global challenges in the organic food and agriculture sector.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Phillipa Nicholas; Serena Mandolesi; Simona Naspetti; Raffaele Zanoli;
    Project: EC | SOLID (266367)

    The growth in organic and low-input farming practices is driven by both market demand for high quality, safe food, and European Union policy support, and these types of farming practices are considered in European Union policies for sustainable production, food quality, healthy life, and rural development. However, many constraints to the development of low-input and organic dairy farming supply chains have been identified, including economic, political, and technical constraints. In order for these types of supply chains to develop and provide further benefits to society, innovations are required to improve their sustainability. However, an innovation will only be taken up and result in desirable change if the whole supply chain accepts the innovation. In this paper, Q methodology is used to identify the acceptability of dairy supply chain innovations to low-input and organic supply chain members and consumers in Belgium, Finland, Italy, and the United Kingdom. A strong consensus existed across all respondents on innovations that were deemed as unacceptable. The use of genetically modified and transgenic organisms in the farming system and innovations perceived as conflicting with the naturalness of the production system and products were strongly rejected. Innovations that were strongly liked across all participants in the study were those related to improving animal welfare and improving forage quality to be able to reduce the need for purchased concentrate feeds. Only minor differences existed between countries as to where the priorities lay in terms of innovation acceptability.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anne Krus; Dirk van Apeldoorn; Constantino Valero; Juan Jose Ramirez;
    Publisher: E.T.S. de Ingeniería Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas (UPM)
    Countries: Spain, Netherlands

    The SUREVEG project focuses on improvement of biodiversity and soil fertility in organic agriculture through strip-cropping systems. To counter the additional workforce a robotic tool is proposed. Within the project, a modular proof of concept (POC) version will be produced that will combine detection technologies with actuation on a single-plant level in the form of a robotic arm. This article focuses on the detection of crop characteristics through point clouds obtained with two lidars. Segregation in soil and plants was successfully achieved without the use of additional data from other sensor types, by calculating weighted sums, resulting in a dynamically obtained threshold criterion. This method was able to extract the vegetation from the point cloud in strips with varying vegetation coverage and sizes. The resulting vegetation clouds were compared to drone imagery, to prove they perfectly matched all green areas in said image. By dividing the remaining clouds of overlapping plants by means of the nominal planting distance, the number of plants, their volumes, and thereby the expected yields per row could be determined.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Axelle Poizat; Florence Bonnet-Beaugrand; Arnaud Rault; Christine Fourichon; Nathalie Bareille;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Mastitis is a bacterial disease common in dairy farms. Although knowledge about mastitis and its optimal technical management and treatment is now available, some dairy farmers still use antibiotics in inappropriate ways. Antibiotic use by farmers can be influenced by personal restraints and motivations, but it can be assumed that external drivers are also influential. The main purpose of this article is thus to analyse the choices of antibiotic and alternative medicine use for mastitis treatment and investigate the possible influence of two unexplored external drivers in dairy farms: (i) the health advice offered to farmers by farm advisors and veterinarians, (ii) the dairy farming system, as defined by combining the market valuation chosen for the milk, the level of intensification, and the perceived pressure related to investments. Research was based on 51 individual semi-structured interviews with farmers and their corresponding veterinarians and farm advisors. Based on verbatim, the use of antibiotics and alternative medicine by farmers for mastitis treatment, the vet-farmers interactions, and the dairy farming systems are described. The advisory relationships between farmers and farm advisors and between farmers and veterinarians influenced the implementation of selective dry cow therapy, but had very little effect on the use of alternative medicines by farmers, who were more willing to experiment alternative medicines than their advisors. The dairy farming system had very little influence on antibiotic use: some misuse of antibiotics was found whatever the farming system. Systematic dry cow therapy was also a widespread habit in all dairy farming systems except organic. The use of alternative medicine was common in all farming systems.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Presentation . Conference object . Other literature type . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rasmussen, Ilse Ankjær; Jensen, Allan Leck;

    The Open Access archive Organic Eprints (www.orgprints.org) has developed since the start in 2002 so that it now includes more than 16,000 items and gets more than 240,000 visits per month. The archive is open for all to use and registered users can deposit their research publications from refereed journals as well as non-refereed sources. Organic Eprints is the largest database in the world with publications about Organic Agriculture & Food Systems research. Organic Eprints have 26 national editors checking the deposits for bibliographical correctness and subject relevance. Organic Eprints has adapted the use of keywords from an external thesaurus, AgroVoc.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tobechi Onyenali; V.I.O. Olowe; T. O. Fabunmi; A. A. Soretire;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) yield in tropical Africa remains below 1 t/ha partly because most growers rarely use beneficial organic soil amendments on degraded tropical soils. Therefore, field trials were conducted during the late cropping seasons (July–November) of 2015 and 2016 on the organic research plots of the Institute of Food Security, Environmental Resources and Agricultural Research, Nigeria (7° 13′ 51.17″ N and 7° 13′ 53.16″ N and longitudes 3° 23′ 49.12″ E and 3° 23′ 51.86″ E 131.5 m above sea level), the trials evaluated the agronomic response of five recently released soybean varieties (TGx 1448-2E, TGx 1440-1E, TGx 1740-2F, TGx 1987-62F, and TGx 1835-10E) to the application of three organic fertilizers (Aleshinloye grade B, Organo Farm, and Gateway) and a control. The trials were laid out in randomized complete block design (RCBD) in a 5 × 4 factorial arrangement and replicated three times. Data were collected on growth parameters, yield and yield attributes, and seed quality. Significant (p < 0.05, F test) varietal difference was recorded for aboveground plant weight, grain filling period, height at physiological maturity, number and weight of pods, number of branches and seed yield, and quality in both years. Application of organic fertilizers significantly (p < 0.05, F test) increased aboveground plant weight, number of branches and pods per plant, weight of seeds per plant, seed yield, and quality in both years relative to the control treatment, except oil content and seed yield in 2016. It is recommended that the three organic fertilizers can be used for soybean cultivation since soybeans grown on treated plots produced seed yield above 1/ton in both contrasting years of experimentation.