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2,152 Research products, page 1 of 216

  • Rural Digital Europe
  • Part of book or chapter of book
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  • Hyper Article en Ligne - Sciences de l'Homme et de la Société
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  • Rural Digital Europe

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  • English
    Authors: 
    Emetumah, Faisal,;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; It has been 35 years since Igbozurike and Raza (1983), and rural communities in Nigeria continue to face many of the challenges identified in the ARMTI seminar. Poverty and rural-urban migration remain widespread in Nigeria. Further issues of security and terrorism have also made their way into the array of problems facing rural communities in Nigeria. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the issues affecting the quality of life in 21st century rural Nigeria, in order to ascertain what has changed or remained the same since 1983. In achieving the study aim, the parameters used by Igbozurike and Raza (1983) will be linked with current literature on the quality of life in rural Nigeria. The paper will look at the following parameters: socioeconomic indicators, social services and infrastructure, nutritional status, population structure and mobility, institutional frameworks and the role of Agricultural Development Projects (ADPs).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Clément Rolinat; Mathieu Grossard; Saifeddine Aloui; Christelle Godin;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Grasp planning and most specifically the grasp space exploration is still an open issue in robotics. This article presents a data-driven oriented methodology to model the grasp space of a multi-fingered adaptive gripper for known objects. This method relies on a limited dataset of manually specified expert grasps, and uses variational autoencoder to learn grasp intrinsic features in a compact way from a computational point of view. The learnt model can then be used to generate new non-learnt gripper configurations to explore the grasp space. accepted at SYSID 2021 conference

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . Preprint . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Caterina Caracciolo; Sophie Aubin; Clement Jonquet; Emna Amdouni; Romain David; Leyla Garcia; Brandon Whitehead; Catherine Roussey; Armando Stellato; Ferdinando Villa;
    Countries: Italy, France, Spain
    Project: ANR | D2KAB (ANR-18-CE23-0017), EC | RDA Europe 4.0 (777388), EC | EOSC-Life (824087), EC | EPPN2020 (731013), ANR | PHENOME (ANR-11-INBS-0012)

    In this paper, we report on the outputs and adoption of the Agrisemantics Working Group of the Research Data Alliance (RDA), consisting of a set of recommendations to facilitate the adoption of semantic technologies and methods for the purpose of data interoperability in the field of agriculture and nutrition. From 2016 to 2019, the group gathered researchers and practitioners at the crossing point between information technology and agricultural science, to study all aspects in the life cycle of semantic resources: Conceptualization, edition, sharing, standardization, services, alignment, long term support. First, the working group realized a landscape study, a study of the uses of semantics in agrifood, then collected use cases for the exploitation of semantics resources a generic term to encompass vocabularies, terminologies, thesauri, ontologies. The resulting requirements were synthesized into 39 hints for users and developers of semantic resources, and providers of semantic resource services. We believe adopting these recommendations will engage agrifood sciences in a necessary transition to leverage data production, sharing and reuse and the adoption of the FAIR data principles. The paper includes examples of adoption of those requirements, and a discussion of their contribution to the field of data science. © 2020 The Author(s). Brandon Whitehead acknowledges with thanks the support of the CABI Development Fund. CABI is an international intergovernmental organization and we gratefully acknowledge the core financial support from our member countries (and lead agencies) including the United Kingdom (Department for International Development), China (Chinese Ministry of Agriculture), Australia (Australian Center for International Agricultural Research), Canada (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada), Netherlands (Directorate-General for International Cooperation), and Switzerland (Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation). See https:// www.cabi.org/about-cabi/who-we-work-with/key-donors/ for details. Sophie Aubin, Clement Jonquet, Emna Amdouni, Romain David and Catherine Roussey were supported, in part, by the French National Research Agency (ANR) Data to Knowledge in Agronomy and Biodiversity (D2KAB – www.d2kab.org – ANR-18-CE23-0017). Romain David was partly supported by the EPPN2020 project (H2020 grant N°731013), the EOSC-Life european program (grant agreement N°824087), the ‘Infrastructure Biologie Sante’ PHENOME-EMPHASIS project funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR-11-INBS-0012) and the ‘Programme d’Investissements d’Avenir’.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Caroline K. Mirieri; Gratian N. Mutika; Jimmy Bruno; Momar Talla Seck; Baba Sall; Andrew G. Parker; Monique M. van Oers; Marc J. B. Vreysen; Jérémy Bouyer; Adly M. M. Abd-Alla;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Netherlands, France, France, France
    Project: EC | REVOLINC (682387)

    Background: Tsetse flies transmit trypanosomes that cause the debilitating diseases human African trypanosomosis (HAT) or sleeping sickness in humans and animal African trypanosomosis (AAT) or nagana in livestock. The riverine tsetse species Glossina palpalis gambiensis Vanderplank (Diptera: Glossinidae) inhabits riparian forests along river systems in West Africa. The Government of Senegal has embarked on a project to eliminate a population of this tsetse species from the Niayes area with the objective to manage AAT in the area. The project is implemented following an area-wide integrated pest management approach with an SIT component. The SIT can only be successful when the sterile males that are released in the field are of high biological quality, i.e. have the same dispersal capacity, survival and competitiveness as their wild counterparts. To date, sterile tsetse males have been released by air using biodegradable cardboard cartons that were manually dropped from a fixed-wing aircraft or gyrocopter. The cardboard boxes are however expensive, and the system is rather cumbersome to implement. Methods: A new prototype of an automated chilled adult release system (Bruno Spreader Innovation, (BSI™)) for tsetse flies was tested for its accuracy (in counting numbers of sterile males as loaded into the machine), release rate consistency and impact on quality of the released males. The impact of the release process was evaluated on several performance indicators of the irradiated male flies such as flight propensity, survival, mating competitiveness, premating and mating duration, and insemination rate of mated females. Results: The BSI TM release system counted with a consistent accuracy and released homogenously tsetse flies at the lowest motor speed (0.6 rpm). In addition, the chilling conditions (6 ± 1 o C) and the release process (passing of flies through the machine) had no significant negative impact on the males' flight propensity. No significant differences were observed between the control males (no irradiation and no exposure to the release process), irradiated males (no exposure to the release process) and irradiated males exposed to the release process with respect to mating competitiveness, premating period and mating duration. Only survival of irradiated males that were exposed to the release process was reduced, irrespective of whether the males were held with or without feeding. Conclusion: Although the release process had a negative effect on survival of the flies, the data of the experiments indicate that the BSI machine holds promise for use in operational tsetse SIT programmes. The promising results of this study will now need to be confirmed under operational field conditions in West Africa.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2010
    French
    Authors: 
    Bessaoud, Omar;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Chapitre I : Un regard dans le rétroviseur. De l'autogestion à la réforme agraire de 1987; International audience; « Aux portes d’Alger, s’étend sur un arc de cercle de trente lieues, du Chenoua (à l’ouest), au Corso (à l’est), une plaine qui sépare le Sahel de l’Atlas. Cette plaine est la Mitidja que les Arabes ont célébrée pour sa fécondité et ses richesses en l’appelant la mère des pauvres, cette ennemie de la faim ». L’auteur nous invite à redécouvrir la Mitidja à travers l’histoire. Que savons-nous et que retenir de l’histoire de cette plaine dont la destinée reste étroitement liée à l’histoire politique, sociale et économique de l’Algérie ?

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 1997
    Italian
    Authors: 
    Beatrice von Hirschhausen;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
  • Open Access Spanish
    Authors: 
    Albaladejo, Christophe;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Dinámica de la inserción territorial de la agricultura pampeana y emergencia del agribusiness

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2016
    English
    Authors: 
    Laurent Herment; Annie Antoine;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roberto Fernandez-Moran; Amen Al-Yaari; Arnaud Mialon; Ali Mahmoodi; Ahmad Al Bitar; Gabrielle De Lannoy; Ernesto Lopez-Baeza; Yann Kerr; Jean-Pierre Wigneron;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Belgium, France

    © 2017 by the authors. The main goal of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission over land surfaces is the production of global maps of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation optical depth (τ) based on multi-angular brightness temperature (TB) measurements at L-band. The operational SMOS Level 2 and Level 3 soil moisture algorithms account for different surface effects, such as vegetation opacity and soil roughness at 4 km resolution, in order to produce global retrievals of SM and τ. In this study, we present an alternative SMOS product that was developed by INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique) and CESBIO (Centre d'Etudes Spatiales de la BIOsphère). One of the main goals of this SMOS-INRA-CESBIO (SMOS-IC) product is to be as independent as possible from auxiliary data. The SMOS-IC product provides daily SM and τ at the global scale and differs from the operational SMOS Level 3 (SMOSL3) product in the treatment of retrievals over heterogeneous pixels. Specifically, SMOS-IC is much simpler and does not account for corrections associated with the antenna pattern and the complex SMOS viewing angle geometry. It considers pixels as homogeneous to avoid uncertainties and errors linked to inconsistent auxiliary datasets which are used to characterize the pixel heterogeneity in the SMOS L3 algorithm. SMOS-IC also differs from the current SMOSL3 product (Version 300, V300) in the values of the effective vegetation scattering albedo (ω) and soil roughness parameters. An inter-comparison is presented in this study based on the use of ECMWF (European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting) SM outputs and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) from MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). A six-year (2010-2015) inter-comparison of the SMOS products SMOS-IC and SMOSL3 SM (V300) with ECMWF SM yielded higher correlations and lower ubRMSD (unbiased root mean square difference) for SMOS-IC over most of the pixels. In terms of τ SMOS-IC τ was found to be better correlated to MODIS NDVI in most regions of the globe, with the exception of the Amazonian basin and the northern mid-latitudes. ispartof: Remote Sensing vol:9 issue:457 pages:1-21 status: published

  • Publication . Other literature type . Book . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Edmond, Jennifer; Romary, Laurent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Introduction The scholarly monograph has been compared to the Hapsburg monarchy in that it seems to have been in decline forever! It was in 2002 that Stephen Greenblatt, in his role as president of the US Modern Language Association, urged his membership to recognise what he called a ‘crisis in scholarly publication’. It is easy to forget now that this crisis, as he then saw it, had nothing to do with the rise of digital technologies, e-publishing, or open access. Indeed, it puts his words in...

search
Include:
The following results are related to Rural Digital Europe. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,152 Research products, page 1 of 216
  • English
    Authors: 
    Emetumah, Faisal,;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; It has been 35 years since Igbozurike and Raza (1983), and rural communities in Nigeria continue to face many of the challenges identified in the ARMTI seminar. Poverty and rural-urban migration remain widespread in Nigeria. Further issues of security and terrorism have also made their way into the array of problems facing rural communities in Nigeria. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the issues affecting the quality of life in 21st century rural Nigeria, in order to ascertain what has changed or remained the same since 1983. In achieving the study aim, the parameters used by Igbozurike and Raza (1983) will be linked with current literature on the quality of life in rural Nigeria. The paper will look at the following parameters: socioeconomic indicators, social services and infrastructure, nutritional status, population structure and mobility, institutional frameworks and the role of Agricultural Development Projects (ADPs).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Clément Rolinat; Mathieu Grossard; Saifeddine Aloui; Christelle Godin;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Grasp planning and most specifically the grasp space exploration is still an open issue in robotics. This article presents a data-driven oriented methodology to model the grasp space of a multi-fingered adaptive gripper for known objects. This method relies on a limited dataset of manually specified expert grasps, and uses variational autoencoder to learn grasp intrinsic features in a compact way from a computational point of view. The learnt model can then be used to generate new non-learnt gripper configurations to explore the grasp space. accepted at SYSID 2021 conference

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . Preprint . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Caterina Caracciolo; Sophie Aubin; Clement Jonquet; Emna Amdouni; Romain David; Leyla Garcia; Brandon Whitehead; Catherine Roussey; Armando Stellato; Ferdinando Villa;
    Countries: Italy, France, Spain
    Project: ANR | D2KAB (ANR-18-CE23-0017), EC | RDA Europe 4.0 (777388), EC | EOSC-Life (824087), EC | EPPN2020 (731013), ANR | PHENOME (ANR-11-INBS-0012)

    In this paper, we report on the outputs and adoption of the Agrisemantics Working Group of the Research Data Alliance (RDA), consisting of a set of recommendations to facilitate the adoption of semantic technologies and methods for the purpose of data interoperability in the field of agriculture and nutrition. From 2016 to 2019, the group gathered researchers and practitioners at the crossing point between information technology and agricultural science, to study all aspects in the life cycle of semantic resources: Conceptualization, edition, sharing, standardization, services, alignment, long term support. First, the working group realized a landscape study, a study of the uses of semantics in agrifood, then collected use cases for the exploitation of semantics resources a generic term to encompass vocabularies, terminologies, thesauri, ontologies. The resulting requirements were synthesized into 39 hints for users and developers of semantic resources, and providers of semantic resource services. We believe adopting these recommendations will engage agrifood sciences in a necessary transition to leverage data production, sharing and reuse and the adoption of the FAIR data principles. The paper includes examples of adoption of those requirements, and a discussion of their contribution to the field of data science. © 2020 The Author(s). Brandon Whitehead acknowledges with thanks the support of the CABI Development Fund. CABI is an international intergovernmental organization and we gratefully acknowledge the core financial support from our member countries (and lead agencies) including the United Kingdom (Department for International Development), China (Chinese Ministry of Agriculture), Australia (Australian Center for International Agricultural Research), Canada (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada), Netherlands (Directorate-General for International Cooperation), and Switzerland (Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation). See https:// www.cabi.org/about-cabi/who-we-work-with/key-donors/ for details. Sophie Aubin, Clement Jonquet, Emna Amdouni, Romain David and Catherine Roussey were supported, in part, by the French National Research Agency (ANR) Data to Knowledge in Agronomy and Biodiversity (D2KAB – www.d2kab.org – ANR-18-CE23-0017). Romain David was partly supported by the EPPN2020 project (H2020 grant N°731013), the EOSC-Life european program (grant agreement N°824087), the ‘Infrastructure Biologie Sante’ PHENOME-EMPHASIS project funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR-11-INBS-0012) and the ‘Programme d’Investissements d’Avenir’.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Caroline K. Mirieri; Gratian N. Mutika; Jimmy Bruno; Momar Talla Seck; Baba Sall; Andrew G. Parker; Monique M. van Oers; Marc J. B. Vreysen; Jérémy Bouyer; Adly M. M. Abd-Alla;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Netherlands, France, France, France
    Project: EC | REVOLINC (682387)

    Background: Tsetse flies transmit trypanosomes that cause the debilitating diseases human African trypanosomosis (HAT) or sleeping sickness in humans and animal African trypanosomosis (AAT) or nagana in livestock. The riverine tsetse species Glossina palpalis gambiensis Vanderplank (Diptera: Glossinidae) inhabits riparian forests along river systems in West Africa. The Government of Senegal has embarked on a project to eliminate a population of this tsetse species from the Niayes area with the objective to manage AAT in the area. The project is implemented following an area-wide integrated pest management approach with an SIT component. The SIT can only be successful when the sterile males that are released in the field are of high biological quality, i.e. have the same dispersal capacity, survival and competitiveness as their wild counterparts. To date, sterile tsetse males have been released by air using biodegradable cardboard cartons that were manually dropped from a fixed-wing aircraft or gyrocopter. The cardboard boxes are however expensive, and the system is rather cumbersome to implement. Methods: A new prototype of an automated chilled adult release system (Bruno Spreader Innovation, (BSI™)) for tsetse flies was tested for its accuracy (in counting numbers of sterile males as loaded into the machine), release rate consistency and impact on quality of the released males. The impact of the release process was evaluated on several performance indicators of the irradiated male flies such as flight propensity, survival, mating competitiveness, premating and mating duration, and insemination rate of mated females. Results: The BSI TM release system counted with a consistent accuracy and released homogenously tsetse flies at the lowest motor speed (0.6 rpm). In addition, the chilling conditions (6 ± 1 o C) and the release process (passing of flies through the machine) had no significant negative impact on the males' flight propensity. No significant differences were observed between the control males (no irradiation and no exposure to the release process), irradiated males (no exposure to the release process) and irradiated males exposed to the release process with respect to mating competitiveness, premating period and mating duration. Only survival of irradiated males that were exposed to the release process was reduced, irrespective of whether the males were held with or without feeding. Conclusion: Although the release process had a negative effect on survival of the flies, the data of the experiments indicate that the BSI machine holds promise for use in operational tsetse SIT programmes. The promising results of this study will now need to be confirmed under operational field conditions in West Africa.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2010
    French
    Authors: 
    Bessaoud, Omar;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Chapitre I : Un regard dans le rétroviseur. De l'autogestion à la réforme agraire de 1987; International audience; « Aux portes d’Alger, s’étend sur un arc de cercle de trente lieues, du Chenoua (à l’ouest), au Corso (à l’est), une plaine qui sépare le Sahel de l’Atlas. Cette plaine est la Mitidja que les Arabes ont célébrée pour sa fécondité et ses richesses en l’appelant la mère des pauvres, cette ennemie de la faim ». L’auteur nous invite à redécouvrir la Mitidja à travers l’histoire. Que savons-nous et que retenir de l’histoire de cette plaine dont la destinée reste étroitement liée à l’histoire politique, sociale et économique de l’Algérie ?

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 1997
    Italian
    Authors: 
    Beatrice von Hirschhausen;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
  • Open Access Spanish
    Authors: 
    Albaladejo, Christophe;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Dinámica de la inserción territorial de la agricultura pampeana y emergencia del agribusiness

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2016
    English
    Authors: 
    Laurent Herment; Annie Antoine;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roberto Fernandez-Moran; Amen Al-Yaari; Arnaud Mialon; Ali Mahmoodi; Ahmad Al Bitar; Gabrielle De Lannoy; Ernesto Lopez-Baeza; Yann Kerr; Jean-Pierre Wigneron;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Belgium, France

    © 2017 by the authors. The main goal of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission over land surfaces is the production of global maps of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation optical depth (τ) based on multi-angular brightness temperature (TB) measurements at L-band. The operational SMOS Level 2 and Level 3 soil moisture algorithms account for different surface effects, such as vegetation opacity and soil roughness at 4 km resolution, in order to produce global retrievals of SM and τ. In this study, we present an alternative SMOS product that was developed by INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique) and CESBIO (Centre d'Etudes Spatiales de la BIOsphère). One of the main goals of this SMOS-INRA-CESBIO (SMOS-IC) product is to be as independent as possible from auxiliary data. The SMOS-IC product provides daily SM and τ at the global scale and differs from the operational SMOS Level 3 (SMOSL3) product in the treatment of retrievals over heterogeneous pixels. Specifically, SMOS-IC is much simpler and does not account for corrections associated with the antenna pattern and the complex SMOS viewing angle geometry. It considers pixels as homogeneous to avoid uncertainties and errors linked to inconsistent auxiliary datasets which are used to characterize the pixel heterogeneity in the SMOS L3 algorithm. SMOS-IC also differs from the current SMOSL3 product (Version 300, V300) in the values of the effective vegetation scattering albedo (ω) and soil roughness parameters. An inter-comparison is presented in this study based on the use of ECMWF (European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting) SM outputs and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) from MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). A six-year (2010-2015) inter-comparison of the SMOS products SMOS-IC and SMOSL3 SM (V300) with ECMWF SM yielded higher correlations and lower ubRMSD (unbiased root mean square difference) for SMOS-IC over most of the pixels. In terms of τ SMOS-IC τ was found to be better correlated to MODIS NDVI in most regions of the globe, with the exception of the Amazonian basin and the northern mid-latitudes. ispartof: Remote Sensing vol:9 issue:457 pages:1-21 status: published

  • Publication . Other literature type . Book . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Edmond, Jennifer; Romary, Laurent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Introduction The scholarly monograph has been compared to the Hapsburg monarchy in that it seems to have been in decline forever! It was in 2002 that Stephen Greenblatt, in his role as president of the US Modern Language Association, urged his membership to recognise what he called a ‘crisis in scholarly publication’. It is easy to forget now that this crisis, as he then saw it, had nothing to do with the rise of digital technologies, e-publishing, or open access. Indeed, it puts his words in...