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  • Authors: Debauche, Olivier; Ait Brahim, Rachida; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Moussaoui, Yahya; +2 Authors

    Campus can be assimilate to small smart cities in which learning experience and living condition are improved by smart environment and IoT. In this paper, we present (R)evoCampus our Smart Campus solution based diverted smart Home interoperable protocol platforms, micro controllers ESP32, low-cost sensors. This architecture uses at same time principles of IoT, smart environment technologies, and smart city concepts to develop an effective use of the resources and improve the quality of life inside the whole university. Wi-Fi protocol is used for communication in indoor while outdoor communications are ensured by LoRaWAN protocol.

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  • Authors: Dechambre, D; Baart, Véronique; CUCCHIARO, Séverine; ERNST, Christelle; +5 Authors

    INTRODUCTION: To commission the Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm based model of CyberKnife robotic stereotactic system (CK) and evaluate the feasibility of patient specific QA using the ArcCHECK cylindrical 3D-array (AC) with Multiplug inserts (MP). RESULTS: Four configurations were used for simple beam setup and two for patient QA, replacing water equivalent inserts by lung. For twelve collimators (5-60mm) in simple setup, mean (SD) differences between MC and RayTracing algorithm (RT) of the number of points failing the 3%/1mmgamma criteria were 1(1), 1(3), 1(2) and 1(2) for the four MP configurations. Tracking fiducials were placed within AC for patient QA. Single lung insert setup resulted in mean gamma-index 2%/2mm of 90.5% (range [74.3-95.9]) and 82.3% ([66.8-94.5]) for MC and RT respectively, while 93.5% ([86.8-98.2]) and 86.2% ([68.7-95.4]) in presence of largest inhomogeneities, showing significant differences (p<0.05). DISCUSSION: After evaluating the potential effects, 1.12g/cc PMMA and 0.09g/cc lung material assignment showed the best results. Overall, MC-based model showed superior results compared to RT for simple and patient specific testing, using a 2%/2mm criteria. Results are comparable with other reported commissionings for flattening filter free (FFF) delivery. Further improvement of MC calculation might be challenging as Multiplan has limited material library. CONCLUSIONS: The AC with Multiplug allowed for comprehensive commissioning of CyberKnife MC algorithm and is useful for patient specific QA for stereotactic body radiation therapy. MC calculation accuracy might be limited due to Multiplan's insufficient material library; still results are comparable with other reported commissioning measurements using FFF beams.

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  • Authors: Jemine, Grégory;

    De plus en plus d’organisations du secteur des services s’équipent aujourd’hui de dispositifs numériques variés qui modifient les contextes et les contenus du travail. Ces outils sont présentés comme des ingrédients indispensables des modes managériales actuelles qui permettraient à divers dispositifs organisationnels promouvant la flexibilité et la mobilité de s’incarner. La présente contribution propose une étude des ressorts de l’émergence et de la stabilisation de ces dispositifs numériques qui émergent dans le cours de transformations organisationnelles. Nous montrons comment, dans une compagnie d’assurances, les dispositifs numériques sont mobilisés pour répondre à une volonté de « modernisation » de l’organisation et d’optimisation de l’espace de travail.

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  • Authors: Duchesne, Thomas; Rault, Pierre-Alexis; Quistinic, Pierre; Dufrêne, Marc; +1 Authors

    In Western Europe, natural habitats such as heathlands have been converted into many commercially managed forests, with severe impacts on biodiversity. In dense planted forests, forest edges are often the only suitable areas for ectothermic organisms highly dependent on open habitats for thermoregulation. Surprisingly, the influence of forest edges structure on the thermal quality of microhabitats and reptile species distribution remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined two reptile species and thermal quality of interior forest edges of a coniferous forest in Western France (Brittany). We focused on two hypotheses (i) the vegetation structure of the forest edges drives the thermal quality of the habitat and (ii) structural complexity of the forest edges influences the abundance of two heliothermic reptiles: the common adder (Vipera berus) and the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara). We first deployed temperature sensitive data loggers to quantify thermal conditions along 16 cross-sections of inner forest margins. For each section, 4 temperature loggers were placed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 m from the driveway and we examined the relation to vegetation structure and canopy cover. Second, we carried visual encounter surveys in 55 edges in order to measure the response of two reptiles to the structure of the forest margin along exploitation driveway. Our results show that high local canopy cover decreases microhabitat quality within interior forest edges. We also found that common lizard abundance was significantly influenced by the edge orientation and increased with global canopy openness and ground level vegetation. Adder abundance only increased significantly with the driveway width, suggesting the unmodelled effect of other biotic/abiotic variables. Our study shows that thermal quality of interior edges and driveway characteristics are relevant to support heathland reptile populations. We posit that maintain strips of favourable microhabitats should be an efficient land sharing strategy to combine forestry activities and biodiversity conservation.

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  • Authors: Sarheed, Mohammed; Schärer, Hans-Jakob; Wang-Müller, Qiyan; Flury, Pascale; +4 Authors

    Weed control tries to suppress competitors for a crop and often relies on differential intoxication, making use of differences in uptake, development, or metabolism. We explored the possibility of using natural signals to shift competition in favour of the crop. Using the competitive horsemint (Mentha longifolia) as a paradigm, we showed that essential oils from certain mint species suppress the seedling development of different target species in a specific and efficient manner. The specificity concerned both the donor and the receptor. We demonstrated further that the effect of horsemint oil was specific for actin filaments, and not for microtubules. Since the elimination of actin will impair auxin transport, which is essential for root regeneration in vegetatively propagating weeds, we tested the efficacy of horsemint essential oil in combination with a slow-release carrier against field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis), a pertinent weed in organic cereal production. We observed that the development of this weed can be specifically blocked, especially if the carrier is worked into the soil. We propose that allelopathic interactions, often relying on manipulative chemical signalling, harbour significant potential for organic weed control.

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  • Authors: Kayiba, N.K.; Yobi, D.M.; Devleesschauwer, B.; Mvumbi, D.M.; +10 Authors

    Background: This study aimed to estimate the socio-economic costs of uncomplicated malaria and to explore health care-seeking behaviours that are likely to influence these costs in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a country ranked worldwide as the second most affected by malaria. Methods: In 2017, a cross-sectional survey included patients with uncomplicated malaria in 64 healthcare facilities from 10 sentinel sites of the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) in the DRC. A standard questionnaire was used to assess health care-seeking behaviours of patients. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) and disutility weights (DW) of illness were evaluated by using the EuroQol Group’s descriptive system (EQ-5D-3L) and its visual analogue scale (EQ VAS). Malaria costs were estimated from a patient’s perspective. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) evaluated the uncertainty around the cost estimates. Generalized regression models were fitted to assess the effect of potential predictive factors on the time lost and the DW during illness. Results: In total, 1080 patients (age: 13.1 ± 14 years; M/F ratio: 1.1) were included. The average total costs amounted to US$ 36.3 [95% CI 35.5–37.2] per malaria episode, including US$ 16.7 [95% CI 16.3–17.1] as direct costs and US$ 19.6 [95% CI 18.9–20.3] indirect costs. During care seeking, economically active patients and their relatives lost respectively 3.3 ± 1.8 and 3.4 ± 2.1 working days. This time loss occurred mostly at the pre-hospital stage and was the parameter associated the most with the uncertainty around malaria cost estimates. Patients self-rated an average 0.36 ± 0.2 DW and an average 0.62 ± 0.3 EQ-5D index score per episode. A lack of health insurance coverage (896 out of 1080; 82.9%) incurred substantially higher costs, lower quality of life, and heavier DW while leading to longer time lost during illness. Residing in rural areas incurred a disproportionally higher socioeconomic burden of uncomplicated malaria with longer time lost due to illness and limited access to health insurance mechanisms. Conclusion: Uncomplicated malaria is associated with high economic costs of care in the DRC. Efforts to reduce the cost-of-illness should target time lost at the pre-hospital stage and social disparities in the population, while reinforcing measures for malaria control in the country. © 2021, The Author(s).

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  • Authors: Lefébure, Kévin; Vandenberghe, Christophe; Colinet, Gilles;

    Convention-cadre PROTECT'eau

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  • Authors: Lefébure, Kévin; Vandenberghe, Christophe; Bachelart, Florent; Colinet, Gilles;

    Programme de gestion durable de l’azote en agriculture wallonne

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  • Authors: Calmettes, Marion; Denoyel, Lucas; Duclos, Antoine; Lejus-Bourdeau, Corinne; +10 Authors

    [en] OBJECTIVE: The stress level of participants in high-fidelity simulation stems from various factors but may result in anticipatory anxiety causing sleep disturbances during the night prior to simulation. The objective of this survey was to determine the change in sleep quality of residents during the night prior to the simulation. METHODS: The survey was proposed for 1 year to all residents at the beginning of the simulation, in 10 simulation centres. The questionnaire combined demographics and the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire using visual analogue scales divided into 4 sleep qualitative domains. The primary outcome was the prevalence of sleep disturbance (>10 mm on 1 domain). Secondary outcomes were the prevalence of severe sleep disturbance (>25 mm), as well as qualitatively and quantitatively reported explanatory sleep parameters. RESULTS: Among respondents, 66% [95% CI: 63 to 69] of residents had more than 10 mm and 27% [95% CI: 24 to 30] had more than 25 mm of sleep disturbance. Residents with a sleep disturbance of more than 10 mm had fewer hours of sleep (6.4 [standard deviation=1.8] vs 7.3 [standard deviation=1.3], difference: -0.9 [95% CI: -1.1 to -0.7]; P < .0001), with a higher number of night-time awakenings (1.3 [standard deviation=1.5] vs 0.7 [standard deviation=0.9], difference: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.4 to 0.8]; P < .0001). CONCLUSION: Among residents participating in the simulation, a high prevalence of change in sleep quality during the night before the simulation was noted. Strategies to help residents achieve better sleep prior to simulation should be explored.

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  • Authors: Wu, T.; Redouté, Jean-Michel; Yuce, M. R.;

    In this paper, a wireless implantable sensor prototype with subcutaneous solar energy harvesting is proposed. To evaluate the performance of a flexible solar panel under skin, ex-vivo experiments are conducted under natural sunlight and artificial light sources. The results show that the solar panel covered by a 3 mm thick porcine flap can output tens of microWatts to a few milliWatts depending on the light conditions. The subcutaneous solar energy harvester is tested on different body parts, which suggests the optimal position for the harvester to implant is between neck and shoulder. A wireless implantable system powered by the subcutaneous energy harvester is presented, which consists of a power management circuit, a temperature sensor, and a Bluetooth low energy module. An application is developed for data visualization on mobile devices, which can be a gateway for future IoT-based healthcare applications. The entire device is embedded in a transparent silicone housing (38 mm × 32 mm × 4 mm), including a 7 mAh rechargeable battery for energy storage. The average power consumption of the implants is about 30 μW in a 10 min operation cycle. With the subcutaneous solar energy harvester, the self-powered operation of the implantable sensor prototype is demonstrated by long-term experimental results. Two worst-case scenarios (no exposure to light and battery depletion) are considered with ex-vivo experiment simulations. © 2018 IEEE.

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  • Authors: Debauche, Olivier; Ait Brahim, Rachida; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Moussaoui, Yahya; +2 Authors

    Campus can be assimilate to small smart cities in which learning experience and living condition are improved by smart environment and IoT. In this paper, we present (R)evoCampus our Smart Campus solution based diverted smart Home interoperable protocol platforms, micro controllers ESP32, low-cost sensors. This architecture uses at same time principles of IoT, smart environment technologies, and smart city concepts to develop an effective use of the resources and improve the quality of life inside the whole university. Wi-Fi protocol is used for communication in indoor while outdoor communications are ensured by LoRaWAN protocol.

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  • Authors: Dechambre, D; Baart, Véronique; CUCCHIARO, Séverine; ERNST, Christelle; +5 Authors

    INTRODUCTION: To commission the Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm based model of CyberKnife robotic stereotactic system (CK) and evaluate the feasibility of patient specific QA using the ArcCHECK cylindrical 3D-array (AC) with Multiplug inserts (MP). RESULTS: Four configurations were used for simple beam setup and two for patient QA, replacing water equivalent inserts by lung. For twelve collimators (5-60mm) in simple setup, mean (SD) differences between MC and RayTracing algorithm (RT) of the number of points failing the 3%/1mmgamma criteria were 1(1), 1(3), 1(2) and 1(2) for the four MP configurations. Tracking fiducials were placed within AC for patient QA. Single lung insert setup resulted in mean gamma-index 2%/2mm of 90.5% (range [74.3-95.9]) and 82.3% ([66.8-94.5]) for MC and RT respectively, while 93.5% ([86.8-98.2]) and 86.2% ([68.7-95.4]) in presence of largest inhomogeneities, showing significant differences (p<0.05). DISCUSSION: After evaluating the potential effects, 1.12g/cc PMMA and 0.09g/cc lung material assignment showed the best results. Overall, MC-based model showed superior results compared to RT for simple and patient specific testing, using a 2%/2mm criteria. Results are comparable with other reported commissionings for flattening filter free (FFF) delivery. Further improvement of MC calculation might be challenging as Multiplan has limited material library. CONCLUSIONS: The AC with Multiplug allowed for comprehensive commissioning of CyberKnife MC algorithm and is useful for patient specific QA for stereotactic body radiation therapy. MC calculation accuracy might be limited due to Multiplan's insufficient material library; still results are comparable with other reported commissioning measurements using FFF beams.

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  • Authors: Jemine, Grégory;

    De plus en plus d’organisations du secteur des services s’équipent aujourd’hui de dispositifs numériques variés qui modifient les contextes et les contenus du travail. Ces outils sont présentés comme des ingrédients indispensables des modes managériales actuelles qui permettraient à divers dispositifs organisationnels promouvant la flexibilité et la mobilité de s’incarner. La présente contribution propose une étude des ressorts de l’émergence et de la stabilisation de ces dispositifs numériques qui émergent dans le cours de transformations organisationnelles. Nous montrons comment, dans une compagnie d’assurances, les dispositifs numériques sont mobilisés pour répondre à une volonté de « modernisation » de l’organisation et d’optimisation de l’espace de travail.

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  • Authors: Duchesne, Thomas; Rault, Pierre-Alexis; Quistinic, Pierre; Dufrêne, Marc; +1 Authors

    In Western Europe, natural habitats such as heathlands have been converted into many commercially managed forests, with severe impacts on biodiversity. In dense planted forests, forest edges are often the only suitable areas for ectothermic organisms highly dependent on open habitats for thermoregulation. Surprisingly, the influence of forest edges structure on the thermal quality of microhabitats and reptile species distribution remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined two reptile species and thermal quality of interior forest edges of a coniferous forest in Western France (Brittany). We focused on two hypotheses (i) the vegetation structure of the forest edges drives the thermal quality of the habitat and (ii) structural complexity of the forest edges influences the abundance of two heliothermic reptiles: the common adder (Vipera berus) and the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara). We first deployed temperature sensitive data loggers to quantify thermal conditions along 16 cross-sections of inner forest margins. For each section, 4 temperature loggers were placed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 m from the driveway and we examined the relation to vegetation structure and canopy cover. Second, we carried visual encounter surveys in 55 edges in order to measure the response of two reptiles to the structure of the forest margin along exploitation driveway. Our results show that high local canopy cover decreases microhabitat quality within interior forest edges. We also found that common lizard abundance was significantly influenced by the edge orientation and increased with global canopy openness and ground level vegetation. Adder abundance only increased significantly with the driveway width, suggesting the unmodelled effect of other biotic/abiotic variables. Our study shows that thermal quality of interior edges and driveway characteristics are relevant to support heathland reptile populations. We posit that maintain strips of favourable microhabitats should be an efficient land sharing strategy to combine forestry activities and biodiversity conservation.

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  • Authors: Sarheed, Mohammed; Schärer, Hans-Jakob; Wang-Müller, Qiyan; Flury, Pascale; +4 Authors

    Weed control tries to suppress competitors for a crop and often relies on differential intoxication, making use of differences in uptake, development, or metabolism. We explored the possibility of using natural signals to shift competition in favour of the crop. Using the competitive horsemint (Mentha longifolia) as a paradigm, we showed that essential oils from certain mint species suppress the seedling development of different target species in a specific and efficient manner. The specificity concerned both the donor and the receptor. We demonstrated further that the effect of horsemint oil was specific for actin filaments, and not for microtubules. Since the elimination of actin will impair auxin transport, which is essential for root regeneration in vegetatively propagating weeds, we tested the efficacy of horsemint essential oil in combination with a slow-release carrier against field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis), a pertinent weed in organic cereal production. We observed that the development of this weed can be specifically blocked, especially if the carrier is worked into the soil. We propose that allelopathic interactions, often relying on manipulative chemical signalling, harbour significant potential for organic weed control.

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  • Authors: Kayiba, N.K.; Yobi, D.M.; Devleesschauwer, B.; Mvumbi, D.M.; +10 Authors

    Background: This study aimed to estimate the socio-economic costs of uncomplicated malaria and to explore health care-seeking behaviours that are likely to influence these costs in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a country ranked worldwide as the second most affected by malaria. Methods: In 2017, a cross-sectional survey included patients with uncomplicated malaria in 64 healthcare facilities from 10 sentinel sites of the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) in the DRC. A standard questionnaire was used to assess health care-seeking behaviours of patients. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) and disutility weights (DW) of illness were evaluated by using the EuroQol Group’s descriptive system (EQ-5D-3L) and its visual analogue scale (EQ VAS). Malaria costs were estimated from a patient’s perspective. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) evaluated the uncertainty around the cost estimates. Generalized regression models were fitted to assess the effect of potential predictive factors on the time lost and the DW during illness. Results: In total, 1080 patients (age: 13.1 ± 14 years; M/F ratio: 1.1) were included. The average total costs amounted to US$ 36.3 [95% CI 35.5–37.2] per malaria episode, including US$ 16.7 [95% CI 16.3–17.1] as direct costs and US$ 19.6 [95% CI 18.9–20.3] indirect costs. During care seeking, economically active patients and their relatives lost respectively 3.3 ± 1.8 and 3.4 ± 2.1 working days. This time loss occurred mostly at the pre-hospital stage and was the parameter associated the most with the uncertainty around malaria cost estimates. Patients self-rated an average 0.36 ± 0.2 DW and an average 0.62 ± 0.3 EQ-5D index score per episode. A lack of health insurance coverage (896 out of 1080; 82.9%) incurred substantially higher costs, lower quality of life, and heavier DW while leading to longer time lost during illness. Residing in rural areas incurred a disproportionally higher socioeconomic burden of uncomplicated malaria with longer time lost due to illness and limited access to health insurance mechanisms. Conclusion: Uncomplicated malaria is associated with high economic costs of care in the DRC. Efforts to reduce the cost-of-illness should target time lost at the pre-hospital stage and social disparities in the population, while reinforcing measures for malaria control in the country. © 2021, The Author(s).

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